A comparison of cessation counseling received by current smokers at us dentist and physician offices during 2010-2011

Israel T. Agaku*, Olalekan A. Ayo-Yusuf, Constantine I. Vardavas

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. We compared patient-reported receipt of smoking cessation counseling from US dentists and physicians. Methods. We analyzed the 2010 to 2011 Tobacco Use Supplement of the Current Population Survey to assess receipt of smoking cessation advice and assistance by a current smoker from a dentist or physician in the past 12 months. Results. Current adult smokers were significantly less likely to be advised to quit smoking during a visit to a dentist (31.2%) than to a physician (64.8%). Among physician patients who were advised to quit, 52.7% received at least 1 form of assistance beyond the simple advice to quit; 24.5% of dental patients received such assistance (P < .05). Approximately 9.4 million smokers who visited a dentist in 2010 to 2011 did not receive any cessation counseling. Conclusions. Our results indicate a need for intensified efforts to increase dentist involvement in cessation counseling. System-level changes, coupled with regular training, may enhance self-efficacy of dentists in engaging patients in tobacco cessation counseling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e67-e75
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume104
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2014

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