A national, multicentre, web-based point prevalence survey of antimicrobial use and quality indices among hospitalised paediatric patients across South Africa

P. P. Skosana*, N. Schellack, B. Godman, A. Kurdi, M. Bennie, D. Kruger, J. C. Meyer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: Data on antimicrobial consumption among the paediatric population in public hospitals in South Africa are limited. This needs to be addressed to improve future antimicrobial use and reduce antimicrobial resistance rates. This study aimed to quantify antimicrobial usage and to identify and classify which antimicrobials are used in the paediatric population in public sector hospitals in South Africa according to the World Health Organization (WHO) AWaRe list of antimicrobials. Methods: A point prevalence survey was conducted among 18 public sector hospitals from nine provinces using a newly developed web-based application. Data were analysed according to the WHO AWaRe list to guide future quality improvement programmes. Results: A total of 1261 paediatric patient files were reviewed, with 49.7% (627/1261) receiving at least one antimicrobial and with 1013 antimicrobial prescriptions overall. The top five antimicrobials included ampicillin (16.4%), gentamicin (10.0%), amoxicillin/enzyme inhibitor (9.6%), ceftriaxone (7.4%) and amikacin (6.3%). Antimicrobials from the ‘Access’ classification were the most used (55.9%), with only 3.1% being from the ‘Reserve’ classification. The most common infectious conditions for which an antimicrobial was prescribed were pneumonia (14.6%; 148/1013) and clinical sepsis (11.0%; 111/1013). Parenteral administration (75.6%; 766/1013) and prolonged surgical prophylaxis (66.7%; 10/15) were common concerns. Only 28.0% (284/1013) of prescribed antimicrobials had cultures requested; of which only 38.7% (110/284) of culture results were available in the files. Conclusion: Overall, antimicrobial prescribing is common among paediatric patients in South Africa. Interventions should be targeted at improving antimicrobial prescribing, including surgical prophylaxis, and encouraging greater use of oral antibiotics.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • AWaRe list of antimicrobials
  • Antibiotics
  • Antimicrobial consumption
  • Paediatric
  • Point prevalence survey
  • South Africa

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