Assessing the acceptability of vasectomy as a family planning option: A qualitative study with men in the Kingdom of Eswatini

Philile Shongwe, Busisiwe Ntuli, Sphiwe Madiba*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The uptake of vasectomy in many countries in sub-Saharan Africa is low. In Eswatini, a kingdom with strong patriarchal norms, the use of vasectomy is at 0.3%. This is despite great efforts to introduce vasectomy and involve men in reproductive health. This study explored the views of men about the acceptability of vasectomy and their willingness to adopt vasectomy as a family planning option. Focus group discussions were conducted with adult men recruited from health facilities located in rural, semi urban, and urban areas in two of the regions of Eswatini. A thematic approach was used to analyze the data. The acceptability of and intention to use vasectomy as a family planning option was very low. Cultural beliefs, societal norms, lack of knowledge about the procedure for vasectomy, and misconceptions influenced the acceptability of vasectomy greatly. The participants could not grasp the concept of a family planning method that is as permanent as vasectomy. However, the decisions to accept or reject vasectomy were influenced by their misconceptions and fears about vasectomy and were not based on facts. To address the need to involve men in reproductive health and improve the acceptability and adoption of vasectomy, planning should be conducted with them and informed by their understanding of their needs.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5158
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume16
Issue number24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Dec 2019

Keywords

  • Acceptance
  • Adoption
  • Culture
  • Eswatini
  • Family planning
  • Vasectomy

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