Burden and epidemiology of rotavirus diarrhea in selected african countries: Preliminary results from the african rotavirus surveillance network

Jason M. Mwenda, Kinkela Mina Ntoto, Almaz Abebe, Christabel Enweronu-Laryea, Ismail Amina, Jackson Mchomvu, Annet Kisakye, Evans M. Mpabalwani, Isoro Pazvakavambwa, George E. Armah, L. M. Seheri, Nicholas M. Kiulia, N. Page, Marc Alain Widdowson, A. Duncan Steele

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

128 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Severe rotavirus diarrhea in children <5 years of age is a major public health problem; however, limited regional and country specific data on rotavirus disease burden are available from sub-Saharan Africa. In June 2006, the World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa initiated rotavirus surveillance in selected African countries.With use of standardized methodology developed by theWorld Health Organization, children <5 years of age who were hospitalized with severe diarrhea were enrolled, and stool specimens were collected for detection of rotavirus strains with use of a commercial enzyme immunoassay. Rotavirus strains were further characterized for G and P types with use of a reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. From June 2006 through December 2008, rotavirus surveillance was established at 14 sites in 11 African countries. Of 5461 stool samples collected from children enrolled in 8 countries with 1 or 2 complete years of data, 2200 (40%) were positive for rotavirus. Ninety percent of all rotavirus hospitalizations occurred among children aged 3-12 months. Predominant types included G1P[8] (21%), G2P[4] (7%), and P [8] (29%); however, unusual types were also detected, including G8P[6] (5%), G8P[8] (1%), G12P[6] (1%), and G12P[6] (1%). A high percentage of mixed rotavirus infections was also detected. These preliminary results indicate that rotavirus is a major cause of severe diarrheal disease in African children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S5-S11
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume202
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Burden and epidemiology of rotavirus diarrhea in selected african countries: Preliminary results from the african rotavirus surveillance network'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this