Changes in levels of omega-O-acylceramides and related processing enzymes of sun-exposed and sun-protected facial stratum corneum in differently pigmented ethnic groups

Anthony V. Rawlings, Rotraut Schoop, Christian Klose, Jean Marc Monneuse, Beverley Summers, Rainer Voegeli*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: We report on the differences in ceramide composition and levels of omega-O-acylceramide processing enzymes of sun-exposed and sun-protected facialstratum corneum (SC) among Albino African, Black African and Caucasian women living in South Africa. Methods: Tape strippings were taken from the sun-exposed cheek and the sunprotected postauricular site (PA). In two subsets proteomic (n = 18) and lipidomic (n = 24) analysis were performed using mass-spectrometry-based shotgun platforms. Results: No significant differences in total ceramide levels or ceramide subtypes were found between the Black African and Caucasian women in either the cheek or PA samples. Compared to the other two groups the levels of total ceramide as well as selected omega-O-acylceramide species were increased in Albino Africans. On the cheek, ceramide (CER) EOS, EOH along with CER AS were increased relative to the Caucasian women, while CER EOP and EOdS were elevated relative to the Black African women. Moreover, on the PA site CER EOP and EOdS were elevated compared with the Black African women and CER EOdS in Caucasians. Decreasesin masslevels of 12R-LOX and eLOX3 were observed on cheeks compared with the PA sites in all ethnic groups. On the PA sites 12R-LOX was particularly lower in the Albino Africans compared with the Black African and Caucasian women. On the cheeks mass levels of SDR9C7 was also lower in the Albino Africans. Conclusion: The mass levels of the ceramides were similar between Black African and Caucasian women. However, elevated total ceramides and excessively elevated selected omega-O-acylceramides were apparent in the Albino African women. The findings in the Albino African women were unexpected as these participants suffer from impaired skin barrier function. However, the elevated levels omega-O-acylceramides can contribute to barrier insufficiency by directly impacting SC lipid phase behaviour and/or secondly elevated omegaO-acylceramide levels may indicate a reduced attachment of ceramides to the corneocyte lipid envelope and reduced corneocyte maturation that can also impair the barrier. Indeed, differences in the mass levels of omega-O-acylceramide processing enzymes were observed for 12R-LOX and SDR9C7 for the Albino Africans. This indicates a corneocyte lipid scaffold disorder in this population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)166-176
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Cosmetic Science
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2022

Keywords

  • chemical analysis
  • corneocyte envelope
  • ethnic
  • lipidomics
  • proteomics
  • skin barrier
  • skin physiology/structure

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