Characterisation of rotaviruses from children treated at a London hospital during 1996: Emergence of strains G9P2A[6] and G3P2A[6]

W. D. Cubitt*, A. D. Steele, M. Iturriza

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rotavirus strains from 171 patients treated in 1996 at a children's hospital in London were characterised. Use of a panel of typing monoclonal antibodies for serotypes G1-4 identified 105 (61%) of the strains. The majority, 90 strains (86%), were serotype G1. Characterisation of G (VP7) and P (VP4) types using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was more efficient, and 167 of 171 (98%) of the strains were identified this way. The predominant strains were G1P1A[8] (55%) and G4P1A[8] (17%), which are prevalent throughout the world; however, a significant number of cases were associated with genotypes not recorded previously in the United Kingdom. There were 21 (13%) cases associated with G9P2A[6] and 11 (6%) cases associated with G3P2A[6]. The majority (seven of 10) cases of infection in children older than 3 years of age were caused by these two genotypes. A majority (15/21) of G9P2A[6] strains were recovered from children admitted to the hospital, and five children were sufficiently dehydrated to necessitate intravenous rehydration. (C) 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)150-154
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Medical Virology
Volume61
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Keywords

  • Genotype
  • Rotavirus
  • Serotype
  • VP4
  • VP7

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