Conflicting effects of BMI and waist circumference on iron status

Solomon Simon Ramphai Choma*, Marianne Alberts, Sewela Elizabeth Perpetua Modjadji

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The association between obesity and iron status has a long history and is still receiving attention. However comparative analysis of the association between general obesity (BMI) and visceral obesity (waist circumference) with iron status has not been extensively researched. The aim of the present study is thus to determine if body mass index and waist circumference have the same correlation with iron status. One thousand one hundred and thirty people (225 men and 905 women) aged 30 years and above participated in this study. Anthropometric parameters, haemoglobin, iron and total iron binding capacity concentrations were measured using standard methods. Percentage transferrin saturation was calculated and ferritin concentrations were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Obese or overweight women had significantly lower iron and transferrin saturation concentration when compared to non-obese women. In contrast, women with high waist circumference had comparable plasma iron and transferrin saturation to women with normal waist circumference. Partial correlation analysis and linear regression analysis showed that BMI is negatively and significantly associated with plasma iron, transferrin saturation, Hb and ferritin concentration, whilst waist circumference is positively but insignificantly associated with plasma iron, transferrin saturation, Hb and ferritin concentration. Binary regression analysis showed that obese or overweight people are more likely to have iron deficiency, whilst those with raised waist circumference are more likely to have iron overload. Multivariate analysis showed that body mass index is negatively and significantly associated with low iron status, while waist circumference is positively and insignificantly associated with iron status. This is supported by a comparison of plasma iron, transferrin saturation and ferritin concentrations in participants with high body mass index and normal waist circumference and participants with normal body mass index and high waist circumference to those participants having normal body mass index and normal waist circumference. The present study suggests that in women body mass index is associated with low plasma iron, transferrin saturation and ferritin concentrations, while waist circumference is associated with high plasma iron, transferrin saturation and ferritin concentrations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-78
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology
Volume32
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • BMI
  • Iron deficiency
  • Iron overload
  • Iron status
  • Obesity
  • Waist circumference

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Conflicting effects of BMI and waist circumference on iron status'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this