Effect of exposure to clinic-based health education interventions on behavioural intention to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection

Jude Igumbor, Supa Pengpid, Larry Obi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

HIV and AIDS incidence among infants in South Africa is on the increase. The uptake of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) interventions is often said to be dependent on the beliefs and educational needs of those requiring PMTCT services. This study therefore sought to examine the effect of clinic-based health education interventions (HEI) on behavioural intention of PMTCT among 300 pregnant women from 4 primary health care clinics in Tshilidzini Hospital catchments area, South Africa. An interview schedule was used to obtain information regarding participants' demographic characteristics, level of exposure to clinic-based HEI, salient beliefs and behavioural intention on PMTCT. The major findings included that approximately 85% of the participants had heard of PMTCT. There was very little association between frequency of antenatal clinic (ANC) visits and level of exposure to PMTCT information. Condom use had the lowest set of salient belief scores. Control belief was the most common belief contributing to behavioural intention. Generally, the association between PMTCT salient beliefs and behavioural intention was weak. Clinic-based HEI had an impact on behavioural intention of HIV testing, normative belief of regular ANC visit and nevirapine use. The vital contribution of alternative PMTCT information sources such as the radio and television was observed. Enhancing initiatives that empower women, and a better coordination of the existing HEI through better implementation of health education strategy may strengthen the prevailing moderate PMTCT intention in the area investigated. © 2006 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)394-402
Number of pages9
JournalSahara J
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2006
Externally publishedYes

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