HPV genotypes in women with squamous intraepithelial lesions and normal cervixes participating in a community-based microbicide study in Pretoria, South Africa

H. M. Said*, K. Ahmed, R. Burnett, B. R. Allan, A. L. Williamson, A. A. Hoosen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Little is known regarding the human papillomaviruses (HPV) genotypes prevalent in women in South Africa, a country with a high incidence of cervical cancer. Objective: To determine the prevalence and HPV genotypes in women with squamous abnormalities and normal cervixes participating in a community-based microbicide study. Study design: A total of 159 cervical specimens, including 56 specimens from women with abnormal cytology (cases) and 103 randomly selected specimens from women with normal cytology (controls), were collected. HPV was detected by consensus PCR primers and HPV genotypes were determined by Roche Linear Array® HPV genotyping assay. Results: HPV genotypes were found in 91% of cases and 40% of controls (p < 0.005). High-risk HPV was detected in all high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs), 69% of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs), 57% of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS), and 86% of ASCUS in which HSIL could not be excluded (ASCUS-H), and 73% of HPV positive controls. HPV-35 was the predominant genotype in HSILs; HPV-18 in ASCUS; HPV-58 in ASCUS-H and HPV-16 in LSILs and controls. Conclusion: High-risk HPV prevalence was high in both cases and controls. HPV genotype distribution in HSILs was different from that reported worldwide and from other studies in South Africa.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)318-321
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Virology
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cervical cancer
  • Genotyping
  • HPV
  • SIL

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