Human resource for health reform in peri-urban areas: A cross-sectional study of the impact of policy interventions on healthcare workers in Epworth, Zimbabwe

Bernard Hope Taderera*, Stephen James Heinrich Hendricks, Yogan Pillay

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The need to understand how healthcare worker reform policy interventions impact health personnel in peri-urban areas is important as it also contributes towards setting of priorities in pursuing the universal health coverage goal of health sector reform. This study explored the impact of post 2008 human resource for health reform policy interventions on healthcare workers in Epworth, a peri-urban community in Harare, Zimbabwe, and the implications towards health sector reform policy in peri-urban areas. Methods: The study design was exploratory and cross-sectional and involved the use of qualitative and quantitative methods in data collection, presentation, and analysis. A qualitative study in which data were collected through a documentary search, five key informant interviews, seven in-depth interviews, and five focus group discussions was carried out first. This was followed by a quantitative study in which data were collected through a documentary search and 87 semi-structured sample interviews with healthcare workers. Qualitative data were analyzed thematically whilst descriptive statistics were used to examine quantitative data. All data were integrated during analysis to ensure comprehensive, reliable, and valid analysis of the dataset. Results: Three main factors were identified to help interpret findings. The first main factor consisted policy result areas that impacted most successfully on healthcare workers. These included the deployment of community health workers with the highest correlation of 0.83. Policy result areas in the second main factor included financial incentives with a correlation of 0.79, training and development (0.77), deployment (0.77), and non-financial incentives (0.75). The third factor consisted policy result areas that had the lowest satisfaction amongst healthcare workers in Epworth. These included safety (0.72), equipment and tools of trade (0.72), health welfare (0.65), and salaries (0.55). Conclusions: The deployment of community health volunteers impacted healthcare workers most successfully. This was followed by salary top-up allowances, training, deployment, and non-financial incentives. However, health personnel were least satisfied with their salaries. This had negative implications towards health sector reform interventions in Epworth peri-urban community between 2009 and 2014.

Original languageEnglish
Article number83
JournalHuman Resources for Health
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Dec 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Epworth
  • Health reform
  • Human resources
  • Peri-urban
  • Policy
  • Zimbabwe

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