Mento ring needs of newly appointed nurse educators in nursing education institutions in South Africa

E. Seekoe*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

There seems to be no sufficient mentoring programmes for supporting and guiding newly appointed nurse educators (NANEs) in nursing education institutions (NEIs) in South Africa. The available programmes are international and yet seem not to fully address the needs in the South African context. However, the research identified the need to determine the mentoring needs of NANEs in NEIs in South Africa. The aim of this study was to describe the mentoring needs of NANEs in NEIs in South Africa. A quantitative, descriptive research design was utilised. The population for this study consisted of nurse educators appointed at nursing education institutions in South Africa. The sample was drawn from nurse educators appointed at the universities and nursing colleges in South Africa using a probability, multi-stage, cluster sampling method. The results indicated the need for mentoring to develop required competencies in NEIs and to be mentored in order to improve the performance of NANEs. Two stakeholders in a mentoring relationship, namely, mentor and mentee\ were identified. The role of a mentor seems to be important in facilitating the relationship between the two while the mentee is important in participative interaction. The research concluded that both mentor and mentees have a need to commit to, and actively participate in a relationship. The researcher recommended mentoring of NANE in order to develop required academic competencies and to improve their performance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S56-S70
JournalAfrica Journal of Nursing and Midwifery
Volume17
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Educators
  • Mentoring
  • Needs
  • Newly Appointed
  • Nurse

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