Population health risk due to dietary intake of toxic heavy metals from Spinacia oleracea harvested from soils collected in and around Tshwane, South Africa

Gladness Nteboheng Lion*, Joshua Oluwole Olowoyo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to assess the possible health risk associated with the consumption of vegetables harvested from waste dump sites, trace metal levels in Spinacia oleracea planted in soils collected from waste dump sites were investigated. Soil samples from different waste dump sites and mining areas were collected and placed in different pots. Seedlings of S. oleracea were introduced into the pots, harvested after 3. months and analysed for trace metal contents using ICP-MS. From the leaves of the plants, the concentration of Fe was found to be significantly higher than all other trace metals (p < 0.05). The trend in trace metal accumulation from the leaves was in the order Fe > Mn > Zn > Pb > Cu > Cr > Ni > Cd. A significantly different concentration of trace metals in the plant was noticed from different soils in different pots used (p < 0.05). Trace metal concentration from plant parts showed roots. > leaves. > stem. The risk to human health indicated as Hazard Quotient (HQ) was highest for Zn followed by Cu from all the plant parts. The HQ result showed that humans might be at risk if they consume spinach from these waste dump sites. From the study it was concluded that harvesting/consuming spinach from soil around a waste dump site may be extremely dangerous. © 2013 The Authors.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)178-182
Number of pages5
JournalSouth African Journal of Botany
Volume88
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Soil
  • Spinacia oleracea
  • Trace metals
  • Waste dump sites

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