Prevalence and correlates of psychological distress among national community-based adult populations in Nauru, Tukelau and Tuvalu

Supa Pengpid, Karl Peltzer*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aims: The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence and correlates of psychological distress (PD) in three small Pacific Island countries. Method: National cross-sectional data (pooled sample N = 3,088, 18–69 years) of participants from the STEPS surveys in Nauru (2015/16; N = 1382), Tukelau (2014; N = 554) and Tuvalu (2015; N = 1152) were analysed. Results: In the pooled sample 30.4% participants had PD (⩾20 scores), 18.1% mild (20–24 scores), 7.8% moderate (25–29 scores) and 4.4% severe (30–50 scores) PD. The prevalence of PD in Nauru was 41.5%, in Tukelau 5.0% and in Tuvalu 22.7%. In the adjusted logistic regression analysis with the pooled sample, younger age (18–39 years), alcohol family problems, heart attack/stroke, current smoking, high salt intake and high sedentary behaviour were positively associated with PD, while male sex and being from Tukelau and Tuvalu were negatively associated with PD. Conclusion: Almost one in three participants reported PD and several associated factors were found that can be targeted in population interventions.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Social Psychiatry
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2023
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adults
  • Nauru
  • Tukelau
  • Tuvalu
  • psychological distress

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