Rotavirus strains, 3008cm and 1784/ci/1999, isolated in cameroon and cote d'ivoire during the 1999-2000 rotavirus season

Mathew D. Esona, Nicola A. Page, Veronique A. Akran, George E. Armah, A. Duncan Steele

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During routine rotavirus surveillance projects in Cameroon and Cote d'Ivoire, 2 fecal samples collected from 2 children <5 years of age who presented with symptoms of gastroenteritis were found to give anomalous G typing results. These specimens were strongly rotavirus positive by enzyme immunoassay, displayed VP6 subgroup II specificity and long RNA electropherotypes, and were typed as rotavirus serotype G2 with monoclonal antibodies. In addition, the strains were typed as rotavirus VP7 genotype G3 and VP4 genotype P[8] by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Further investigation of the polymerase chain reaction Gtyping results with a second set of primers revealed that the specimens were not genotype G3, and both samples were sequenced to elucidate the problem. Both strains were found to be genotype G10 by nucleotide sequence. Comparison of nucleotide and amino acid sequences and phylogenetic analysis of the African G10 strains revealed that these strains are closely related to the human G10 strains that were detected during the 2001-2003 rotavirus season in Ghana. The detection of G10 rotavirus in Africa adds to the global distribution of this strain and strengthens the need to continue strain surveillance in developing countries to understand the extent of strain distribution and diversity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S212-S219
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume202
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2010
Externally publishedYes

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