Student’s perspectives, satisfaction and experiences with online and classroom learning during the COVID-19 pandemic: Findings and implications on blended learning

Steward Mudenda*, Victor Daka, Webrod Mufwambi, Scott Kaba Matafwali, Billy Chabalenge, Phumzile Skosana, Ruth Lindizyani Mfune, Maisa Kasanga, Osaretin Christabel Okonji, Godfrey Mayoka, Martin Kampamba, Christabel Nang’andu Hikaambo, Moses Mukosha, Manal Hadi Ghaffoori Kanaan, Lindi Angeline Zikalala-Mabope, George Sinkamba, Roland Nnaemeka Okoro, Martha Chulu, Brian Godman, Joseph Fadare

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic disrupted classroom-based learning, necessitating the adoption of online learning in most universities. However, there has been a lack of information on university students’ perspectives regarding online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study assessed the perspectives, satisfaction and experiences with online and classroom learning among human health students at the University of Zambia. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 737 students at the University of Zambia from October 2022 to April 2023. Data were analysed using Stata version 16.1. Results: Of the 737 participants, 51.6% were female and 56.5% agreed that blended learning should continue even after the COVID-19 pandemic. However, 78.4% of the students believed that group discussions were more suitable in the classroom than online learning. Most students (67.1%) disagreed that they preferred online learning to classroom learning. Furthermore, 77.6% of the students disagreed that online learning gave more satisfaction than classroom learning. Conclusions: This study found that most students recommended the continuation of blended learning after the pandemic. However, they believed that follow-up tutorials and assessments were better undertaken in physical classrooms than online learning. These findings are important in sensitising stakeholders in the education sector and governments to consider blended learning as a teaching strategy in the future. There is a need to develop and implement curricula that offer blended learning to students as well as ensure the students have the necessary facilities and equipment to support such learning.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSAGE Open Medicine
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2023

Keywords

  • Blended learning
  • Zambia
  • classroom learning
  • e-learning
  • online learning
  • satisfaction
  • university students

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