The impact of colonialism on head and neck cancer in Brazil: a historical essay focussing on tobacco, alcohol and slavery

Latin American Cooperative Oncology Group, Brazilian Group of Head and Neck Cancer

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Colonialism's enduring impact on Brazil has had significant implications for health and oncology outcomes. This historical essay delves into the profound changes brought about by the transatlantic slave trade from Africa to the Americas, particularly in terms of its influence on the economy, sociocultural habits, and health outcomes. This essay explores the enduring connections between the colonial period's operational dynamics in Brazil and the current epidemiological panorama of head and neck cancer (HNC). The examination provides original insights on the role of tobacco and alcohol production and consumption, alongside the investigation of structural racism, which contributes to disparities in access to diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis for patients with HNC. This article presents novel visions and an analysis of evidence-based strategies to disrupt the adverse impact of colonialism's legacy on the epidemiology of HNC in Brazil.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100690
JournalThe Lancet Regional Health - Americas
Volume31
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2024
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Brazil
  • Cancer
  • Colonialism
  • Epidemiology
  • Ethnicity
  • Head and neck neoplasms
  • Mortality
  • Prognosis
  • Tobacco

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